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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 354-360

Human bocavirus infection in children hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infections: Does viral load affect disease course?


1 Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Health Sciences, Kartal Dr. Lütfi Kirdar City Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
2 Department of Microbiology, University of Health Sciences, Kartal Dr. Lütfi Kirdar City Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
3 Department of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, University of Health Sciences, Kartal Dr. Lütfi Kirdar City Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
4 Department of Pediatrics, University of Health Sciences, Kartal Dr. Lütfi Kirdar City Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Ayşe Karaaslan
Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Health Sciences, Kartal Dr. Lütfi Kirdar City Hospital, Istanbul
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1995-7645.354421

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Objective: To examine the effects of human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) on the course of lower respiratory tract infections in cases of monoinfection and coinfection, and the effects of HBoV1 viral load on the disease in children under six years old hospitalized with a diagnosis of HBoV1-associated lower respiratory tract infections. Methods: Children under six years of age, who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infection due to HBoV1 between 1 January 2021 and 1 January 2022 were included in the study. Laboratory confirmation of the respiratory pathogens was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Fifty-four (16.4%) children with HBoV1 among 329 children whose PCR was positive with bacterial/viral agent in nasopharyngeal swab samples were included in the study. There were 28 (51.9%) males and 26 (48.1%) females with a median age 23.4 months [interquartile range (IQR): 13.2, 30.0 months] (min-max:1 month-68 months). HBoV1 was detected as a monoinfecton in 26 (48.1%) children, and as a coinfection with other respiratory agents in 28 children (51.9%). In multiple regression analysis, coinfection (P=0.032) was associated with the length of hospitalization (P<0.001; R2=0.166). There was a negative correlation (r= 0.281, P=0.040) between cough and cycle threshold. Fever was found to be positively correlated with C-reactive protein (r=0.568, P<0.001) and procalcitonin (r=0.472; P=0.001). Conclusions: Although we found a higher HBoV1 viral load in children with more cough symptoms in our study, it had no effect on the severity of the disease, such as length of hospital stay and need for intensive care. Coinfection was found to affect the length of hospitalization.


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