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CASE REPORT
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 87-89

Furuncular myiasis by Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) in a healthy child


1 King Abdulaziz University, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Laboratory Technology; Special Infectious Agent Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Laboratory and Blood Bank, Security Forces Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
3 Medical College, Umm Al Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Pediatrics, Umm Al Qura University; Department of Pediatrics, Security Forces Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Majed Hamdi Wakid
King Abdulaziz University, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Laboratory Technology; Special Infectious Agent Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1995-7645.338433

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Rationale: Human myiasis is the invasion of tissue or organs by fly larvae. This could be obligatory, facultative, or accidental. Patient concerns: A 4-year-old Saudi boy complained of fever over the past three days with multiple inflamed painful dermal furuncles and worms-like discharge. Diagnosis: Furuncular obligatory myiasis caused by Wohlfahrtia magnifica. Interventions: Maggots were removed for identification. The wounds were cleaned with antiseptic dressings. Topical and oral antibiotics were applied. Outcomes: Seven days later, the wounds completely healed. Lessons: Although several reports correlated human myiasis with old age, low health status, mental retardation, and low socioeconomic status, but the patient in our case was a healthy child from a family with good socioeconomic status, good hygiene, no history of diseases or mental disability, but traveled to a village where the climate is suitable for fly breeding.


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