Impact Factor 2021: 3.041 (@Clarivate Analytics)
5-Year Impact Factor: 2.776 (@Clarivate Analytics)
Immediacy Index: 0.927
  • Users Online: 507
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 9  |  Page : 409-414

Soil-transmitted helminth egg contamination from soil of indigenous communities in selected barangays in Tigaon, Camarines Sur, Philippines


1 Biology Department, College of Science; Biological Control Research Unit, Center for Natural Sciences and Environmental Research, De La Salle University, Manila, Philippines
2 Biological Control Research Unit, Center for Natural Sciences and Environmental Research, De La Salle University; Department of Parasitology, College of Public Health, University of the Philippines, Manila, Philippines
3 Biology Department, College of Science; Biological Control Research Unit, Center for Natural Sciences and Environmental Research, De La Salle University; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public HealthUniversity of the Philippines, Manila, Philippines

Correspondence Address:
James Owen C Delaluna
Biology Department, College of Science; Biological Control Research Unit, Center for Natural Sciences and Environmental Research, De La Salle University, Manila
Philippines
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1995-7645.290585

Rights and Permissions

Objective: To provide baseline data on the prevalence and intensity of soil-transmitted helminthiasis egg contamination in the soil among indigenous communities. Methods: A total of 317 soil samples from three barangays of indigenous communities communities in Tigaon, Camarines Sur, Philippines were examined for soil-transmitted helminthiasis egg contamination using optimized sugar flotation method. Results: Of the soil samples examined, 141 (44.48%) were contaminated by Ascaris spp., Toxocara spp., and Trichuris spp. with cumulative prevalence varying across the study sites (P<0.01). Ascaris spp. was predominant in all study sites, followed by Toxocara spp. and Trichuris spp. with a prevalence of 41.96%, 7.57%, and 5.36%, respectively. Interestingly, Toxocara pp. has the highest intensity of contamination, followed by Ascaris spp. and Trichuris spp. in term of geometric mean soil-transmitted helminthiasis eggs recovered per one gram soil sample (34.25, 21.45, and 11.85 respectively). Each study site harbors significant amount of soil-transmitted helminthiasis eggs and zoonotic Toxocara eggs, which present high risk of soil-transmitted helminthiasis infection, particularly among children observed to play and cohabitate with animals known to be hosts of these parasites. Conclusions: The alarming rate of soil-transmitted helminthiasis and Toxocara egg contamination reported in this study suggests that additional measures should be undertaken to control soil-transmitted helminthiasis and zoonotic intestinal infections in the country.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed4607    
    Printed42    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded353    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal